Talk:Tutorials/Turtle farming

From Minecraft Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search

Is the design in the diagram (still) correct for Bedrock?[edit]

While trying to get to the beech, the adult turtles appear to get stuck under the top slab. Is there something about this design that doesn't work now in Bedrock? (Or have I just implemented it wrongly?) 90.214.17.133 00:46, 20 October 2018 (UTC)

Hmm, it works for me. I have to check if I got the block spacing right (I can't check now, Minecraft isn't on the computer I'm using now). Your water source block might be too far away from the slab.
Here's a YouTube video showing a similar farm (but not Bedrock edition): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nJC8rSaOKbI
You'll notice in the time-lapse segment shown at the beginning, the turtles also get stuck under the slab but they also get out again. And that farm has its top water block further away from the slab than the design in this article. That video isn't Bedrock edition, though. ~Amatulić (talk) 03:24, 20 October 2018 (UTC)
I just had a look at the farm I built, and the diagram in the article is correct. I found two turtles and attracted them into the farm, and watched as they left of their own accord. One of them spent some time under the slab but eventually made its way out.
It's important that you have a water source block just one block away from that top slab. The air block in between will actually have water flowing through it, but that isn't shown in the picture (there aren't any icons showing downward flow of water from the side). If your water source block is 2 blocks away, then the turtle may not be able to bridge the gap. ~Amatulić (talk) 04:20, 21 October 2018 (UTC)

Which water blocks are sources?[edit]

Of the water blocks to the right of the slabs, which are source blocks? I'm (obviously) a little confused. I note your other comment about the source blocks next to the upper slab, but are any of the others sources or just runoff/stationary? I tried adding water sources in all the places, but it leaves the top right most block as stationary water which, while it might work, I'm fairly sure isn't what you intended... Phunnilemur (talk) 19:16, 5 December 2018 (UTC)

@Phunnilemur: All water blocks shown are stationary source blocks. They will create water flow into the adjacent air blocks. Unfortunately the {{Schematic}} template doesn't include icons for flowing water, so the water runoff isn't shown.
The main idea here is to create a 1-block gap between the top slab and the next water source block, such that a large turtle can span it but a baby turtle can't. I'm using a 1-block gap, but the video linked in the section above uses a 2-block gap between the slab and the water source.
Admittedly this is the most basic farm, not really efficient, but it's feasible in survival mode without needing any special acquisitions. In practice it takes a very long time to get working, and I have a couple of turtles that just hang around without doing anything. Finding eggs to harvest with Silk Touch and transporting them to the farm is one way to get it working faster. ~ Amatulic (talk) 21:05, 5 December 2018 (UTC)

Allowing turtles to leave[edit]

"Each baby turtle will grow up (dropping a scute) and leave."

Why let them leave, instead of fencing them all around to make sure there will be always turtles protected for breeding? --187.94.193.57 22:54, 8 March 2019 (UTC)

That's a good question. I assumed that turtles need to mate away from their home beach, like in the real world. In any case, if they were born in the farm, they will return to the farm to lay eggs. And if the farm gets too crowded with turtles there won't be room for eggs. Also, see my comment above: even if they can leave I have a couple of turtles that don't leave, and they don't do anything else either, just lay around, even if I feed them seagrass. So they might need to leave in order to come back to lay eggs. ~ Amatulic (talk) 04:09, 9 March 2019 (UTC)
  • They don't need to be distant from their home beach for mating. "My turtles" are always near the beach where they lay the eggs.
  • The crowded farm problem can be fixed by killing some of the turtles, but if they are left free to roam outside, they could become difficult to find, or maybe accidentaly die from cactus, lava, creepers, etc. The crowded farm problem can be easily circumvented, while this other I mentioned, can't.
--187.94.193.57 16:21, 9 March 2019 (UTC)
Yes, my turtles don't venture far from their home beach either. The thing is, if you get rid of turtles due to crowding, rather than letting the leave and return to lay eggs when they feel like it, you reduce the population of turtles that can lay eggs in your farm. This is supposed to be an AFK farm, meaning that after your initial management to get it started, it should be maintenance-free after that, letting you return periodically to collect scutes. I'll admit, though, that the farm described in this tutorial has a very slow production rate. I find I have enough other things to do in my survival world that the production rate isn't that important; when I have enough scutes I'll make a helmet and then try some underwater activities, but until then I have plenty of other tasks to do in the overworld. ~ Amatulic (talk) 21:21, 9 March 2019 (UTC)
"letting the[m] leave and return to lay eggs when they feel like it" Are they able to breed without player intervention, that is, without the player feeding seagrass to them?
"This is supposed to be an AFK farm" I thought the breeding couldn't be done AFK.--187.94.193.57 16:45, 10 March 2019 (UTC)
Yes, turtles breed on their own. That's the reason you can find turtle eggs in the first place. I've come across turtles breeding on their own in the wild. The point of this farm is to create a breeding ground that turtles return to, and that confines the baby turtles until they grow up, so scutes can be caught. While turtles can breed without your intervention, sticking around to manage your farm will speed things up. ~ Amatulic (talk) 07:14, 11 March 2019 (UTC)