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Java Edition hardware requirements

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This feature is exclusive to Java Edition.

Any computer with the following hardware should suffice for a vanilla installation of the game. However, for an enjoyable experience, it is encouraged to consult the recommended requirements.

Java 8 is required, though the game comes with its own version of Java, so no manual installation is required.

Requirements CPU RAM GPU Storage OS Notes
Minimum Intel Core i3-3210 / AMD A8-7600 APU or equivalent 2 GB of available RAM, preferably DDR3 1333 MHz Any graphics card supporting OpenGL 1.3 API and VBOs, i.e. OpenGL 1.5.
  • Integrated: Intel HD Graphics 4000 (Ivy Bridge) or AMD Radeon R5 series (Kaveri APU) with OpenGL 4.4
  • Discrete: Nvidia GeForce 400 Series (410+) or AMD Radeon HD 7000 series with OpenGL 4.4.
~180 MB for program data, though worlds can drastically increase this amount. 1 GB should be enough for a normal amount of maps, resource packs, etc. Windows: Windows 7 or later
macOS: OS X 10.9 Maverick
Linux: Any distribution from 2014 or later
Internet access is needed for the launcher to update and download game files, then afterwards that version of Minecraft can be played offline.
Recommended Intel Core i5-4690 / AMD A10-7800 or equivalent 4 GB of available RAM, at least DDR3 1600 MHz Any modern non-entry-level graphics card,[note 1] preferably with OpenGL 4.5.
  • Discrete: GeForce 700 Series (740+) or Radeon R7.
  • Integrated: Intel Iris Graphics 550 or Raedon R7. Use double-channel memory for better speed.
4 GB (SSD is recommended) Windows: Windows 10
macOS: OS X 10.12 Sierra
Linux: Any distribution from 2014 or later
Internet access is required for multiplayer, unless the server is on the LAN.
  1. Comparing hardware models can be quite confusing, since the models usually start with a "generation" number. Entry level graphic cards ending with "10" are almost always not worth the money: just because "910M" is higher than "780" doesn't mean this entry GeForce card beats the highest-end card from the 7th gen. The "GFLOPS" number provided for almost every card can give you a quick idea how beefy it was, but for a meaningful comparison you should ask a benchmark website.